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garfieldminusgarfield:

G-G the book - G-G on Facebook - G-G on Twitter

(Source: imafuckingdemig0d)


Added at 7:06pm32 notes
Men Taking Up Too Much Space on the Train ↘

feelingpolitical:

an excellent example for teaching Iris Marion Young’s “Throwing Like a Girl: A Phenomenology of Feminine Body Comportment, Motility, and Spatiality”

My students all laugh and then completely deny EVER having behaved this way themselves, because they are liars.

Added at 2:27pm3 notes

(Source: lavievecue)

cunty:

Chet Baker, You Don’t Know What Love Is (Rome, 1956)

cunty:

Chet Baker, You Don’t Know What Love Is (Rome, 1956)
I will have an undergraduate class, let’s say a young white male student, politically-correct, who will say: “I am only a bourgeois white male, I can’t speak.” … I say to them: “Why not develop a certain degree of rage against the history that has written such an abject script for you that you are silenced?” Then you begin to investigate what it is that silences you, rather than take this very determinist position-since my skin colour is this, since my sex is this, I cannot speak… From this position, then, I say you will of course not speak in the same way about the Third World material, but if you make it your task not only to learn what is going on there through language, through specific programmes of study, but also at the same time through a historical critique of your position as the investigating person, then you will have earned the right to criticize, you be heard. When you take the position of not doing your homework- “I will not criticize because of my accident of birth, the historical accident” - that is the much more pernicious position.

Gayatri Spivak 

HOLY SHIT YES YES YES

(via adornoble)

it’s also SUCH a reverse victimization thing like

when ~antiracist allies~ say this shit it always includes this sort of faux-self-deprecating element

and intentionally or not, there’s the implication that we white people in general are being ~silenced~ by the ~cruel~ person of color, and that ~oh no we’ve been taught to hate ourselves for our whiteness and believe all these self-deprecating things~ which of course is EXACTLY the white guilt script that more blatantly racist whites looking at this will want to see as more ‘justification’ to dismiss analysis of racism.

and it’s inevitably framing people of color as mean or angry or ~reverse racist~ and ourselves as beleaguered; it’s inevitably fishing for compliments, for coddling, for having the conversation recentered around us and derailing the actual conversation taking place.

(via impromptuonedykedanceparty)

(Source: fearandwar)

Added at 10:39am3,057 notes

orchid-ink:

iraffiruse:

Satisfying things

being a human is so weird


Added at 9:32pm496,728 notes
DON’T EXPECT OLD-SCHOOL RELICS like penises or vaginas. Don’t expect titillation. Pollution, pesticides, hormones, and waste-management crises have changed human anatomy: Every year, the distance between a man’s wiener and butthole is shrinking. Good riddance to cocksureness. Economies crash; decorators pin cash, like Mardi Gras tinsel, to circulating fans. Aspirants seize crazy new names, like household products or security codes: Pasta, Twi-Key, Sen-Teen, Adobe, Wait, Able. Parents abandon children: Abandonment is the new sexy sine qua non. Being a foundling doesn’t preclude having a Mom in tow. Trecartin and his muses hang out in a house, unheimlich gemutlich as the homes in Eraserhead, Carrie, Blue Velvet, Notorious, and Naked. In Trecartin’s zone, you needn’t buy or rent property—just squat. Trash the place; repaint it, upload it, hit “Send.” You never sleep and are never sleepy, unless your voice gets slowed down by QuickTime or some other software I don’t know the name of. Slash your neck with paint. Separate your head from your body to downplay the dull genitals. Surgically mark your neck with a horizontal predella or with a pseudo-tracheotomy scar—as if warming up for decapitation, or posthumously recovering from it. As far as I can judge, the most conspicuous and telling body paint, in several videos, occurs on the neck. Voice is the anxiety point, and therefore the painterly—the stroke, the slash, the cut, the mark—concentrates its supposedly retardataire energies on the very place where orality and literacy stage their war of the worlds.
Added at 9:25am3 notes
Woman, Man, Bourbon

newyorker:

image

Ian Crouch on Woodford Reserve’s controversial new ads: http://nyr.kr/1mdYvZm

“Despite the modern, fashionable feel of its new ads, Woodford Reserve’s definitions of gender are radically narrow, and its sense of the possibilities for human sexuality even narrower. Men must appeal to women, and women to men. To attract women, men have to be rugged and capable while maintaining a perfect veneer of nonchalance. Women can spot a phony or a wimp a mile away.”

this is relevant to my interests

(Source: newyorker.com)

Added at 1:18pm116 notes

gpoy 24/7

(Source: youtube.com)

Added at 11:07am0 notes

neurosciencestuff:

Scientists discover brain’s anti-distraction system

Two Simon Fraser University psychologists have made a brain-related discovery that could revolutionize doctors’ perception and treatment of attention-deficit disorders.

This discovery opens up the possibility that environmental and/or genetic factors may hinder or suppress a specific brain activity that the researchers have identified as helping us prevent distraction.

The Journal of Neuroscience has just published a paper about the discovery by John McDonald, an associate professor of psychology and his doctoral student John Gaspar, who made the discovery during his master’s thesis research.

This is the first study to reveal our brains rely on an active suppression mechanism to avoid being distracted by salient irrelevant information when we want to focus on a particular item or task.

McDonald, a Canada Research Chair in Cognitive Neuroscience, and other scientists first discovered the existence of the specific neural index of suppression in his lab in 2009. But, until now, little was known about how it helps us ignore visual distractions.

“This is an important discovery for neuroscientists and psychologists because most contemporary ideas of attention highlight brain processes that are involved in picking out relevant objects from the visual field. It’s like finding Waldo in a Where’s Waldo illustration,” says Gaspar, the study’s lead author.

“Our results show clearly that this is only one part of the equation and that active suppression of the irrelevant objects is another important part.”

Given the proliferation of distracting consumer devices in our technology-driven, fast-paced society, the psychologists say their discovery could help scientists and health care professionals better treat individuals with distraction-related attentional deficits.

“Distraction is a leading cause of injury and death in driving and other high-stakes environments,” notes McDonald, the study’s senior author. “There are individual differences in the ability to deal with distraction. New electronic products are designed to grab attention. Suppressing such signals takes effort, and sometimes people can’t seem to do it.

“Moreover, disorders associated with attention deficits, such as ADHD and schizophrenia, may turn out to be due to difficulties in suppressing irrelevant objects rather than difficulty selecting relevant ones.”

The researchers are now turning their attention to understanding how we deal with distraction. They’re looking at when and why we can’t suppress potentially distracting objects, whether some of us are better at doing so and why that is the case.

“There’s evidence that attentional abilities decline with age and that women are better than men at certain visual attentional tasks,” says Gaspar, the study’s first author.

The study was based on three experiments in which 47 students performed an attention-demanding visual search task. Their mean age was 21. The researchers studied their neural processes related to attention, distraction and suppression by recording electrical brain signals from sensors embedded in a cap they wore.

will i need to have it injected into my skull thru a cap of electrodes? because okay.

neurosciencestuff:

Scientists discover brain’s anti-distraction system
Two Simon Fraser University psychologists have made a brain-related discovery that could revolutionize doctors’ perception and treatment of attention-deficit disorders.
This discovery opens up the possibility that environmental and/or genetic factors may hinder or suppress a specific brain activity that the researchers have identified as helping us prevent distraction.
The Journal of Neuroscience has just published a paper about the discovery by John McDonald, an associate professor of psychology and his doctoral student John Gaspar, who made the discovery during his master’s thesis research.
This is the first study to reveal our brains rely on an active suppression mechanism to avoid being distracted by salient irrelevant information when we want to focus on a particular item or task.
McDonald, a Canada Research Chair in Cognitive Neuroscience, and other scientists first discovered the existence of the specific neural index of suppression in his lab in 2009. But, until now, little was known about how it helps us ignore visual distractions.
“This is an important discovery for neuroscientists and psychologists because most contemporary ideas of attention highlight brain processes that are involved in picking out relevant objects from the visual field. It’s like finding Waldo in a Where’s Waldo illustration,” says Gaspar, the study’s lead author.
“Our results show clearly that this is only one part of the equation and that active suppression of the irrelevant objects is another important part.”
Given the proliferation of distracting consumer devices in our technology-driven, fast-paced society, the psychologists say their discovery could help scientists and health care professionals better treat individuals with distraction-related attentional deficits.
“Distraction is a leading cause of injury and death in driving and other high-stakes environments,” notes McDonald, the study’s senior author. “There are individual differences in the ability to deal with distraction. New electronic products are designed to grab attention. Suppressing such signals takes effort, and sometimes people can’t seem to do it.
“Moreover, disorders associated with attention deficits, such as ADHD and schizophrenia, may turn out to be due to difficulties in suppressing irrelevant objects rather than difficulty selecting relevant ones.”
The researchers are now turning their attention to understanding how we deal with distraction. They’re looking at when and why we can’t suppress potentially distracting objects, whether some of us are better at doing so and why that is the case.
“There’s evidence that attentional abilities decline with age and that women are better than men at certain visual attentional tasks,” says Gaspar, the study’s first author.
The study was based on three experiments in which 47 students performed an attention-demanding visual search task. Their mean age was 21. The researchers studied their neural processes related to attention, distraction and suppression by recording electrical brain signals from sensors embedded in a cap they wore.

will i need to have it injected into my skull thru a cap of electrodes? because okay.

girlannachronism:

Grace Jones wearing a twenty foot long dress by Keith Haring at 1987 New Years Eve party

girlannachronism:

Grace Jones wearing a twenty foot long dress by Keith Haring at 1987 New Years Eve party
kateordie:

magnass:


Wonder Woman

#Can somebody put ‘Patriarchy’ on the glass so I can use that gif for you know reasons? egalitarianmuse here u go :)


This is what the internet is for.

look, cocktails!

(Source: class-struggle-anarchism)

look, cocktails!