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neurosciencestuff:

Scientists discover brain’s anti-distraction system

Two Simon Fraser University psychologists have made a brain-related discovery that could revolutionize doctors’ perception and treatment of attention-deficit disorders.

This discovery opens up the possibility that environmental and/or genetic factors may hinder or suppress a specific brain activity that the researchers have identified as helping us prevent distraction.

The Journal of Neuroscience has just published a paper about the discovery by John McDonald, an associate professor of psychology and his doctoral student John Gaspar, who made the discovery during his master’s thesis research.

This is the first study to reveal our brains rely on an active suppression mechanism to avoid being distracted by salient irrelevant information when we want to focus on a particular item or task.

McDonald, a Canada Research Chair in Cognitive Neuroscience, and other scientists first discovered the existence of the specific neural index of suppression in his lab in 2009. But, until now, little was known about how it helps us ignore visual distractions.

“This is an important discovery for neuroscientists and psychologists because most contemporary ideas of attention highlight brain processes that are involved in picking out relevant objects from the visual field. It’s like finding Waldo in a Where’s Waldo illustration,” says Gaspar, the study’s lead author.

“Our results show clearly that this is only one part of the equation and that active suppression of the irrelevant objects is another important part.”

Given the proliferation of distracting consumer devices in our technology-driven, fast-paced society, the psychologists say their discovery could help scientists and health care professionals better treat individuals with distraction-related attentional deficits.

“Distraction is a leading cause of injury and death in driving and other high-stakes environments,” notes McDonald, the study’s senior author. “There are individual differences in the ability to deal with distraction. New electronic products are designed to grab attention. Suppressing such signals takes effort, and sometimes people can’t seem to do it.

“Moreover, disorders associated with attention deficits, such as ADHD and schizophrenia, may turn out to be due to difficulties in suppressing irrelevant objects rather than difficulty selecting relevant ones.”

The researchers are now turning their attention to understanding how we deal with distraction. They’re looking at when and why we can’t suppress potentially distracting objects, whether some of us are better at doing so and why that is the case.

“There’s evidence that attentional abilities decline with age and that women are better than men at certain visual attentional tasks,” says Gaspar, the study’s first author.

The study was based on three experiments in which 47 students performed an attention-demanding visual search task. Their mean age was 21. The researchers studied their neural processes related to attention, distraction and suppression by recording electrical brain signals from sensors embedded in a cap they wore.

will i need to have it injected into my skull thru a cap of electrodes? because okay.

neurosciencestuff:

Scientists discover brain’s anti-distraction system
Two Simon Fraser University psychologists have made a brain-related discovery that could revolutionize doctors’ perception and treatment of attention-deficit disorders.
This discovery opens up the possibility that environmental and/or genetic factors may hinder or suppress a specific brain activity that the researchers have identified as helping us prevent distraction.
The Journal of Neuroscience has just published a paper about the discovery by John McDonald, an associate professor of psychology and his doctoral student John Gaspar, who made the discovery during his master’s thesis research.
This is the first study to reveal our brains rely on an active suppression mechanism to avoid being distracted by salient irrelevant information when we want to focus on a particular item or task.
McDonald, a Canada Research Chair in Cognitive Neuroscience, and other scientists first discovered the existence of the specific neural index of suppression in his lab in 2009. But, until now, little was known about how it helps us ignore visual distractions.
“This is an important discovery for neuroscientists and psychologists because most contemporary ideas of attention highlight brain processes that are involved in picking out relevant objects from the visual field. It’s like finding Waldo in a Where’s Waldo illustration,” says Gaspar, the study’s lead author.
“Our results show clearly that this is only one part of the equation and that active suppression of the irrelevant objects is another important part.”
Given the proliferation of distracting consumer devices in our technology-driven, fast-paced society, the psychologists say their discovery could help scientists and health care professionals better treat individuals with distraction-related attentional deficits.
“Distraction is a leading cause of injury and death in driving and other high-stakes environments,” notes McDonald, the study’s senior author. “There are individual differences in the ability to deal with distraction. New electronic products are designed to grab attention. Suppressing such signals takes effort, and sometimes people can’t seem to do it.
“Moreover, disorders associated with attention deficits, such as ADHD and schizophrenia, may turn out to be due to difficulties in suppressing irrelevant objects rather than difficulty selecting relevant ones.”
The researchers are now turning their attention to understanding how we deal with distraction. They’re looking at when and why we can’t suppress potentially distracting objects, whether some of us are better at doing so and why that is the case.
“There’s evidence that attentional abilities decline with age and that women are better than men at certain visual attentional tasks,” says Gaspar, the study’s first author.
The study was based on three experiments in which 47 students performed an attention-demanding visual search task. Their mean age was 21. The researchers studied their neural processes related to attention, distraction and suppression by recording electrical brain signals from sensors embedded in a cap they wore.

will i need to have it injected into my skull thru a cap of electrodes? because okay.

girlannachronism:

Grace Jones wearing a twenty foot long dress by Keith Haring at 1987 New Years Eve party

girlannachronism:

Grace Jones wearing a twenty foot long dress by Keith Haring at 1987 New Years Eve party
kateordie:

magnass:


Wonder Woman

#Can somebody put ‘Patriarchy’ on the glass so I can use that gif for you know reasons? egalitarianmuse here u go :)


This is what the internet is for.

look, cocktails!

(Source: class-struggle-anarchism)

look, cocktails!

mariecalloway:

In full communism, govt. would give me grant to pursue true love

Added at 11:38am88 notes

randomweas:

denst:  

Video → (X) 


Added at 12:41am252,398 notes
I am jealous of those who think more deeply, who write better, who draw better, who look better, who live better, who love better than I.

—  Sylvia Plath (via babelpois)

(Source: have--not)

Added at 9:35pm200,911 notes

(Source: onegodonemaster)

(Source: whadafunknyc)

NATIONAL POETRY MONTH DAY 1: “TO SELL SWEETIE” BY BARBARA JANE REYES ↘

therumpus:

“Sweetie” is a digital decoy designed to trick perverts into thinking they’re having webcam sessions with a real live 10-year-old Filipina. In just two months, researchers were able to identify 1,000 people who offered money to the fake profile in exchange for sex acts. According to the…

Added at 12:06am29 notes

we-rob-banks:

This morning at Macarthur BART: Yahoo bus blocked with a hearse, climbed, vomited on (x)


Added at 11:21am43 notes

mariecalloway:

More than 300 female prisoners took advantage of the huge earthquake that hit the northern coast of Chile and escaped late Tuesday, officials said.

The prisoners set fire to the site after the massive jailbreak, which happened as the penitentiary was being evacuated, according to El Mundo newspaper.

Added at 5:12pm36 notes

brooklyntheory:

Options, Bushwick, Brooklyn

…or all of the above, dammit.

brooklyntheory:

Options, Bushwick, Brooklyn

…or all of the above, dammit.
…an interest in Nietzsche or Bataille didn’t represent a way of distancing oneself from Marxism or communism. Rather, it was almost the only path leading to what we, of course, thought could be expected of communism. This need for the total rejection of the world in which we found ourselves living…

— Michel Foucault, Remarks on Marx (via gloomy-planets)

(Source: post-makhno)

Added at 7:27am140 notes

Look, cocktails!

(Source: thelittleblackfish)

Look, cocktails!